Latest Event Updates

EoC Meeting 2016: Agenda & Speakers List Are Now Online

Posted on Updated on

Michael_Naughton_Amy_Uelmen.xlthumb
The agenda and list of speakers for the upcoming EoC Meeting 2016 has been published and can we viewed at the following page.

The agenda includes:

  • Presentations and workshops on integral entrepreneurship, spiritual management, and conflict resolution
  • Discussions on the role of subsidiarity in business
  • Experiences social and spiritual entrepreneurs
  • Showing of the Poverty, Inc. documentary and subsequent panel discussion with the film director
  • Daily meditation, community-building and renewal

It is not too late to register!

THE ECONOMY OF COMMUNION – HOPE IN ACTION

Looking for a way to respond to poverty, inequality, unemployment, and other broken systems in our world today? Do you feel, or ar you searchIng for a sense of calling in your work?

Join the annual gathering of the Economy of Communion network – a group of entrepreneurs, economists, and enthusiasts for purpose-filled work and life.

WHERE: St. Thomas University,  St. Paul, MN

WHEN: June 10th, 9am – June 12th, noon (complimentary welcome reception June 9th, 5pm)

Register online. We look forward to your participation.

The North American Economy of Communion Association

 

Advertisements

Spirituality in the Workplace: It’s not what you think!

Posted on Updated on

By Jim Funk

Spirit Tree / Astonishing light peeks through a tree on the coast.

When we enter our workplace are we expected to bring only our body and mind, and leave our spirits at the door? Much has been written about spirituality in the workplace, and there are many different interpretations of what that means. Some of my clients say there is no way that anything spiritual can be introduced into their workplaces. Others believe that recognizing the fact that the whole person—body, mind and spirit—comes with us to work provides a greater opportunity for personal, as well as organizational, transformation and development.

First of all, by spirituality I do not mean religion. While religious beliefs and faith traditions give us a way of expressing our spirituality and practicing our beliefs, our spirit is something different. The human spirit enables us to have an awareness of meaning, to form values, to have relationships with others, and to make choices through reflection and the use of our intellect. Some believers, philosophers and theologians would say our spirit connects us with God, and reflects our relationship with the Mystery that created us. But whether we believe in God, or are atheist or agnostic, most people will agree that the human spirit does exist, and that it is more than just a part of our physical being, personality and mental state. In fact, the human spirit is what distinguishes us from all other living creatures. It allows us to hope, to dream, and to yearn for a greater meaning and purpose in life.

So how and why should we talk about spirituality in the workplace, and how can it be done? Just as our physical self enables us to complete tasks, and our mind allows us to think, judge and act, our spirit gives us the capacity to bring our passions, deeply held values and motivations into our work. Recently I heard a person reflect on the life of a famous actress when he said, “She brought a wonderful spirit to her work.” What does that mean? I think it means we are in fact able to “see” and experience the spirit of people, which shows up as authenticity. When we invite spirituality to be expressed and nurtured in the workplace, we don’t mean proselytizing or converting people; rather, we simply allow time and space for people to be themselves—to be “integrated” (meaning to have integrity) without duplicity. When we are able to integrate all the aspects of our lives, how we make decisions, and how we relate to others, then we can be at our best and give our best as authentic and whole personsnot just skillsets.

When we invite spirituality to be expressed and nurtured in the workplace, we don’t mean proselytizing or converting people; rather, we simply allow time and space for people to be themselves—to be “integrated” (meaning to have integrity) without duplicity.

Some might think that spirituality in the workplace should be reserved only for faith-based or church-sponsored organizations. I worked for a faith-based organization for many years that I thought did an excellent job of spirituality at work, even in the midst of a very diverse workforce and leaders with different or no faith traditions at all. I also came to understand through that experience that people everywhere have a need for spiritual expression and development, not just in workplaces where spirituality is natural or expected. The spiritual nature of people can be respected, acknowledged and nurtured in any work environment without engaging in religious practices, but rather by making spiritual practices acceptable and normal for anyone who wishes to participate in them.

One of my clients, a for-profit company, has a moment of silent reflection before every staff meeting. During this pause everyone is free to use the time however they wish, and the client feels that it allows people to become more centered and fully present at the meeting. Recently I facilitated an off-site retreat for a government client, and I tried something similar. I invited the group to take a few moments for personal reflection and journaling on their vocation of service to others, as well as gratitude for what they personally believe is the source of that vocation or calling (e.g., how they got there). Was that praying together? No. Was that religion? No. Was that a spiritual practice? Yes. It simply provided space and a way for the spirit in each person to be expressed, in whatever way the person decided to express it.

What can you do with Spirituality in your organization?

Any workplace can recognize the body, mind and spirit of people when leaders are willing to make space and time for the whole person to come to work. Besides the examples I gave from my two clients, here are some additional ways for people to express spirituality in the workplace:

  • Designate and dedicate a space where employees can go for personal reflection on breaks. Wherever possible, offer access to green space, nature or indoor plants.
  • Encourage and give employees time off for service to the community, and/or for retreat days sponsored by their church if they belong to one.
  • Have a memorial service (non-denominational) annually for employees or their family members who have passed away in the last year.
  • Celebrate team and individual accomplishments, and acknowledge the gifts and talents that brought it about.
  • Provide a retreat day at least once a year for the executive team, the entire leadership team, and for all employees in groups.
  • Offer classes in mindfulness, tai chi, yoga, meditation, or other practices that help people experience the connection between their body, mind and spirit.

Implementing these ideas in the workplace might take extra effort, but it’s worth it. Holistic organizations that treat people as whole human beings rather than expendable “human resources” find their employees experience deeper meaning in their work, discover more of their gifts and talents, and grow personally and professionally. I’ve seen firsthand that employees are more satisfied, engaged, and happy because they feel appreciated for who they are on a personal level. Bringing spirituality into the workplace also addresses the problem of duplicity, where people feel they can’t be themselves at work and have to play a role that is different from who they actually are. Duplicity causes stress and an uncomfortable dissonance within a person. The results can range from slight dissatisfaction to actually becoming physically sick. A holistic workplace is a healthier workplace.

A holistic workplace comes from holistic leadership. My next blog post will introduce a model of holistic leadership which brings out the best in people, teams and organizations.


Jim Funk is a consultant who helps leaders, teams and organizations discover and develop their full potential. He is passionate in believing that strong leadership competence combined with the leader’s personal characteristics, values and virtues are key to achieving goals and driving business results. In addition to his work at J L Funk & Associates, Jim has served on various boards and commissions, and is currently a member of the Economy of Communion in North America Commission. Learn more about Jim’s work at www.jlfunk.com and www.linkedin.com/in/jlfunk or e-mail him at jim@jlfunk.com.

 

Humanizing Human Resources

Posted on

02b22c8
By Jim Funk

Years ago, when Personnel Departments around the country were beginning to change their name to Human Resources, I proudly told a friend that my job title at the time was changing from Personnel Director to Director of HR—we were coming into the modern business age. I was taken aback when he retorted, “How dehumanizing to refer to people as resources!” I thought a lot about his reaction, and in many ways he was absolutely right. At least “personnel” had a connotation that the work is about the people. By definition, “resources” means “money, or any property that can be converted into money.” In other words, resources are things we own and/or use. This is not typically the way people like to think of themselves.

Before I go any further, I want to clarify that the purpose of this article is not to criticize Human Resources departments, or the moniker. Companies can call their HR departments whatever they want, but it isn’t the name that’s going to make the difference. It’s how they treat employees. That’s why this blog post raises the big picture question of how companies think about their employees: as usable resources or as people?

I had another friend who told me why he left a good job at a company he originally thought was a great place to work. As a consultant he worked hard and put in lots of time, churned out many billable hours, and did excellent work for his company and their clients. One time his boss said something quite chilling to him, something to the effect of: “You know, you are like inventory to me. When I need you, I take you down from the shelf and put you in service. When I don’t, I put you back and you stay there until I need you again.” It was at that moment when my friend realized he was not in a place that respected him as a person, and so with his highly sought-after skills he quickly found another position elsewhere.

Large group of people

My friend’s story is the perfect example of an inhuman approach to management. His boss treated him as a resource to use up and wear out. And soon enough, he did just that.

Wouldn’t it be better to value your employees, work to develop and engage them, and keep them around? I sure think so. Far too many organizations today need to put the “human” back in human resources.

There is a quote attributed to four sisters of the Daughters of Charity who came to Indianapolis in 1881 to open a new hospital at the request of Francis Silas Chatard, Bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Vincennes. In speaking of their mission, the sisters said, “We have a mission, a reason for being here. To keep health care human, human for our patients, human for our families, human for our doctors and human for all associates. The poor will come and the rich will come, if they know they are going to be treated as people.” Their philosophy worked, as that was the beginning of what is now St.Vincent, a thriving, successful, mission-focused health system of hospitals and care providers in Indiana. 

When you treat employees as people, you acknowledge that they are more than just their job title. They have a mind, body, and spirit that make them a human being; a person with dreams, goals, and a life outside of work. I believe that whether we can successfully treat employees as people in the workplace depends on the leader.

I was speaking with an executive at one of St.Vincent’s facilities recently, Blake Dye, President of St.Vincent Heart Center. He told me how important it is to have a balanced, holistic view of work, self and others, and to model and encourage work-life balance. When every new leader comes on board, Blake talks with him or her about his belief that we bring our whole selves with us to work, and that who we are is not just made up of our skillsets. He points out that being successful is first about being capable, but it is also about balance. He stresses that he doesn’t want his leaders to just have the appearance of being busy and working hard, but to do excellent work and achieve results within a reasonable workweek. He tells leaders that if they have to work excessive hours to get the job done, then they aren’t doing something right. He acknowledges that leading healthcare is hard work, so he takes an interest in making sure their work doesn’t overtake and exhaust them, knowing they cannot be at their best in any aspect of their life if that happens.

What Can Leaders Do?

Meaningful change comes from the top. As a leader, what can you do to make your workplace more human?

  1. Speak to your employees at the time of their orientation and acknowledge the importance of work-life balance, and share some practices that encourage it. Model what you say, and ask yourself if you are also allowing yourself to be human and practice work-life balance.
  2. Integrate your messages to employees so that excellence and respect for our human nature are balanced. Emphasize that excellence includes learning from mistakes, and if we are too afraid of failure we may not be bold enough to create new solutions and find better ways of doing things.
  3. Create policies and practices that encourage new skill development within your workforce. Plan and budget for employee training and development.
  4. Assess your workplace culture. I have done this with clients using a Cultural Health Indicator (CHI) tool, and have found it to be very revealing about what makes for a flourishing workplace.
  5. Add a “People Report” to the Board agenda—before the Financial Report—to emphasize the important work people are doing to help meet organizational goals and to discuss what could be improved.

Making a workplace human is not only the right thing to do, it engages people because they are able to flourish and be at their best. The sisters who came to Indianapolis to start St.Vincent 135 years ago knew that, and they also knew that patients, families, doctors, associates, and people of all types and socioeconomic levels served by the hospital would be attracted to that kind of place. They were right.

My next blog post will explore what it means to attend to the body, mind and spirit of people at work, and how spirituality in the workplace is not limited to faith-based organizations.


Jim Funk is a consultant who helps leaders, teams and organizations discover and develop their full potential. He is passionate in believing that strong leadership competence combined with the leader’s personal characteristics, values and virtues are key to achieving goals and driving business results. In addition to his work at J L Funk & Associates, Jim has served on various boards and commissions, and is currently a member of the Economy of Communion in North America Commission. Learn more about Jim’s work at www.jlfunk.com and www.linkedin.com/in/jlfunk or e-mail him at jim@jlfunk.com.

 

Register for the EOC Meeting 2016

Posted on

Campus Aerials
University of St. Thomas

Join us for the 2016 gathering of the Economy of Communion that will be hosted and co-sponsored by the University of St. Thomas, in St. Paul, MN.

The meeting will officially kick off Friday June 10th at 9am and conclude with lunch on Sunday June 12th.

Participants are also invited to join a dinner and reception with special visitors from Cameroon on Thursday June 9th beginning at 5pm.

You can find more info at the following page and register here.

Business Results Can Soar When People Are Treated As People

Posted on

02b22c8  By Jim Funk

Why do you do business with particular companies, stores or individuals? They certainly must have the product, quality and service you want; but what else beyond that? Being treated as a whole person is what makes the difference. It’s good for people—and good for business. Let’s look at two real-life examples.

  1. Treating Customers Right…is good for business

John Mundell knows a thing or two about taking care of customers. As President of Mundell & Associates, an Economy of Communion (EoC) business in the field of environmental consulting, he takes pride in exceeding clients’ expectations and bringing a sensitivity to all stakeholders in every project. In fact, the company website describes their innovative solutions as a combination of “scientific knowledge and a person-centered approach,” and highlights one of the Economy of Communion’s top values: Considering the Human Person in business.

I spoke with Mundell about their philosophy and he explained how it’s actually helped them build and retain a loyal client base. One example that he felt was particularly impactful was a time when they were able to solve a client’s engineering problem quickly and inexpensively, considering the situation, but their $3,000 fee was still more than the client wanted to pay. Even though Mundell thought it was a fair price, rather than insist on the full payment he said the client could pay what they thought the service was worth. They paid $1,000. But it wasn’t a loss for Mundell & Associates. The client wanted to continue the relationship and over the next three years brought them over $1 million worth of new business. The client let Mundell know he earned their loyalty when they felt they were treated fairly in that very first decision regarding the invoice and the client’s concern was put ahead of the company’s.

Mundell is convinced that when businesses consciously put people and relationships ahead of profits, value team interests over self-interests and intentionally serve the other person, clients want to work with that kind of company. For Mundell & Associates, besides being the right thing to do, they believe treating customers right has translated into millions of dollars in revenue that the company would not have otherwise received.

  1. Put Employees First…and they will in turn put customers first

People Arrow - JLFunk Blog4.jpgCameron Mitchell Restaurants is a privately held company that is not affiliated with the
Economy of Communion, but they have adopted many of the same principles and business practices as the EoC. Mitchell began with one small restaurant in Columbus, Ohio in 1993, which has now grown to 25 units and 12 different restaurant concepts with locations in 11 states. Their website explains that they use the term “associates” instead of employees in order to recognize and respect their importance. Putting people first is core to Cameron Mitchell’s way of doing business, which he believes is their differentiating strategy. Mitchell says they don’t just hire great people; they make sure to treat them great once they’re on board. That, in turn, inspires a genuine hospitality that guests, vendors and even members of the community sense and appreciate. Mitchell is convinced that the spark for their growth and success is the “people first” culture they have deeply embedded in their restaurants.

I asked Chuck Davis, the Vice President of Human Resources for Cameron Mitchell, what they do to create and sustain their “people first” culture and what difference it makes. He told me how they treat associates well from the time they are recruited, through their orientation and throughout their employment. Specifically, they have practices like closing their restaurants for seven major holidays, plus Super Bowl Sunday—unheard of in the restaurant business—so associates can enjoy those events with their families. They emphasize reward and recognition that associates appreciate. One small example is they hand out delicious milkshakes to reward associates regularly. To Mitchell’s associates, a milkshake is much better than a handshake! And as a “topping” they pay competitive wages and benefits that attract and retain their valuable associates. They also emphasize their development and give associates opportunities to learn, grow and build skills. They promote from within more than 75% of the time.

The result?

  • Mitchell’s employee engagement survey had 99.57% participation.
  • Employee satisfaction registers in the mid to high 90th percentiles.
  • Associates receive better tips than the industry average.
  • Turnover is lower than it usually is in the restaurant business.
  • And when it comes to business results, they have financial outcomes that exceed industry standards.

These results support the company’s belief that treating associates as whole persons translates to customer satisfaction, which in turn improves the bottom line.

Why is a Person-Centered Philosophy Good for Business?

From these examples we can see that customers want to do business with companies that treat them well, and employees want to work for an employer that respects and appreciates them. Further, this effect isn’t limited to only customers and employees. It’s true for the board room, company leadership, suppliers, partners, communities where they are located, and for anyone who interacts in some way with a company. Not only is it the right thing to do, but good reputations spread—which leads to customer and employee loyalty. It becomes a cycle that translates into higher volumes, increased revenues, lower costs and higher margins.

Person Centered Practices

How does an organization become person-centered? Like for Mundell and Mitchell, focusing on people must become embedded in the culture: leadership, policies and practices, and how everything plays out day-to-day in real situations. Here are some of the suggestions I make to my clients who want to build a person-centered culture.

  1. Empower employees (or better yet, “associates”) at all levels to be able to address customer concerns.
  2. Take quick “pulse” surveys (not long and arduous opinion surveys) to check in quickly and regularly with people about how they’re doing, what they need to be at their best, and how to get those needs met.
  3. Describe the desired culture, and then hire for fit to that culture, especially in leadership positions where being person-centered is modeled and held up as “how we do things.”
  4. Give employees opportunities to reward and recognize each other, ask what makes them feel appreciated, and encourage it at all levels.
  5. Check out important decisions with some key stakeholders before you proceed, and ask questions about how will they be impacted, what pitfalls have you not thought of, and how the decision could best be communicated.

In my next blog we will look at what makes a workplace human. You might be surprised at my ideas, especially coming from a person who has spent most of his career in Human Resources!


Jim Funk is a consultant who helps leaders, teams and organizations discover and develop their full potential. He is passionate in believing that strong leadership competence combined with the leader’s personal characteristics, values and virtues are key to achieving goals and driving business results. In addition to his work at J L Funk & Associates, Jim has served on various boards and commissions, and is currently a member of the Economy of Communion in North America Commission. Learn more about Jim’s work at www.jlfunk.com and www.linkedin.com/in/jlfunk or e-mail him at jim@jlfunk.com.

5 Things Employees Need to be at Their Best

Posted on Updated on

02b22c8

By Jim Funk

Group of business people.

People love hearing the words, “You did a great job on that project!” Most people want to do a good job, and are willing to work hard to do their best. But in the world of work, the reality is that it doesn’t always happen. Why? Certain circumstances play a role in how engaged employees are in their jobs, and these factors impact performance.

I believe that enabling employees to do their best boils down to the ability to meet 5 important needs:

  1. To be treated as a whole person – body, mind and spirit. People want to be recognized for who they are, and not simply a set of skills or productivity numbers. They bring their whole selves to work, and need some degree of nurturing and expression in each of the dimensions of the human person: physical, intellectual, spiritual, social, and leisure.
  2. To be treated fairly. Policies and practices provide clarity regarding expectations, and they help ensure that people will be treated fairly. But as everyone knows, a policy manual doesn’t provide answers to every situation. Leaders must be able to make decisions that are just. Don’t get me wrong, everyone won’t always agree with every decision a leader makes, but all decisions should be supported by a rational explanation.
  3. To have safety, security and trust. The workplace must be one that feels safe and secure, with ready access to assistance if a safety or security issue arises. But more than physical safety and security, employees in this day and age seek job security. People need to feel the organization’s leaders can be trusted to keep their word, and communicate with honesty and transparency, especially as it relates to job security. When layoffs are expected or people are let go, they should be told the truth and assisted in making the transition.
  4. To have a thriving community at work. By definition we could say that any work group is a community of people. But a thriving community is one in which people are individually and collectively at their best because the work culture recognizes the importance of relationships and teamwork. Competition between teams can also be healthy, and fun!
  5. To have meaning in their work. While work is certainly a means to making a living, people need to feel that their work makes a difference in the world. Further, there is an inherent dignity in work because it allows the person to become more fully who he or she is. People need to feel that their talents and skills are being used, and want to be given the opportunity to grow and develop so that they can reach their full potential. 

When these 5 needs are met, people feel more fulfilled and more committed to doing their best work for the organization. It might seem obvious, but what does it really take to meet these needs? First of all, organizations whose values include statements like, “a great place to work,” or “people are our most valuable asset,” must be able to live up to those and not just give lip service. Leaders who understand these needs and intentionally work to meet them are what make the difference. I would call this “holistic leadership,” because the holistic leader treats people as people and not just a skillset or a “human resource.”

What Can Leaders Do?

When I consult with organizations, I recommended that leaders ask each of their employees to write down answers to three questions:

  1. What do you need in order to do your job well and be at your best?
  2. What will it take for you to ask for and get what you need?
  3. What types of rewards motivate you and make you feel appreciated?

I suggest that they keep this sheet of paper in all of their employees’ folders, so when they meet with them or want to reward them they can be more personal and specific in addressing their needs. It works!

Please share any comments, reactions or questions you have about these ideas. If you believe you are working or have worked in an organization with leaders like those I am describing, I invite you to write about it in a reply to this blog or contact me directly. I would like to talk with you. In my next blog post we will look at the business case for holistic leadership, and what difference it can make in terms of actual outcomes.


Jim Funk is a consultant who helps leaders, teams and organizations discover and develop their full potential. He is passionate in believing that strong leadership competence combined with the leader’s personal characteristics, values and virtues are key to achieving goals and driving business results. In addition to his work at J L Funk & Associates, Jim has served on various boards and commissions, and is currently a member of the Economy of Communion in North America Commission. Learn more about Jim’s work at www.jlfunk.com and www.linkedin.com/in/jlfunk or e-mail him at jim@jlfunk.com.

Connecting The 3 Ps: People, Productivity and Profits

Posted on Updated on

02b22c8

By Jim Funk

What is most important in your organization? People, productivity or profits? Many people look at the 3 Ps as independent or competing priorities; but what is often misunderstood is the dynamic connection between the three.

People Holding Chart - JLFunk Blog2Let’s say you believe that profits are most important. It’s true that an organization can’t exist for very long without a black bottom line and a good return for shareholders (or financial stewardship in not-for-profits and government sectors). Or, if you say that productivity is most important because without it profits will suffer, that is true as well. Productivity is certainly a key to success.  But productivity doesn’t guarantee profitability or financial stewardship, because there are too many other variables involved.  And high profits may only demonstrate short-term success that could change in the future.

On the other hand, giving people first place in the equation may be altruistic, but it’s also logical. People have the power to do what is required to be productive, generate a profit and manage resources effectively. That’s why people are the foundation of the three Ps. The innate human ability to think, judge and act is the only way to drive business outcomes and reach organizational goals. The variables within people are capability, capacity and motivation. Leaders must attend to all three of those variables, not only in selection, development and recognition, but in the engagement of people in the vision and what it will take to bring that vision to reality.

First and foremost, leaders must make the mission and vision clear and communicate it on a regular basis. Where are we headed and why? When leaders understand people and provide what is needed in order for them to do their best, creativity, engagement and excitement are unleashed both individually and collectively. That energy is what drives increased productivity and innovation. This spreads beyond employees and engages suppliers, partners, affiliates and others, because people want to give their best to an organization and its leaders that give their best to people. This is not simply a “quid-pro-quo;” it is a true energy that cannot be defined by a social or legal contract – and it’s powerful.

Further, customers want to do business with the organization that puts its employees first because they sense and experience what it means to be treated as a person. This in turn increases market share and company profitability. In the not-for-profit and government sectors it increases effectiveness, efficiency and good stewardship of available resources. This is not to say that a sound business plan, strong fiscal management and the market forces of supply and demand don’t play an important part in productivity and profitability – that’s a given. But keeping the person in the center of the business or organization is just as conscious a choice, and is what makes the real difference to both productivity and profits.

Please share any comments, reactions or questions you have about these ideas. If you believe you are working or have worked in an organization with leaders like those I am describing, I invite you to write about it in a reply to this blog or contact me directly. I would like to talk with you. In my next blog post we will look more closely at what people need to be at their best.


Jim Funk is a consultant who helps leaders, teams and organizations discover and develop their full potential. He is passionate in believing that strong leadership competence combined with the leader’s personal characteristics, values and virtues are key to achieving goals and driving business results. In addition to his work at J L Funk & Associates, Jim has served on various boards and commissions, and is currently a member of the Economy of Communion in North America Commission. Learn more about Jim’s work at www.jlfunk.com and www.linkedin.com/in/jlfunk or e-mail him at jim@jlfunk.com.